/ by Jared Jones

  entertainingtheidea : 

    Rosamund Pike  has been to star in an untitled project that will tell the story of  Marie Colvin , the American reporter who died while covering the siege of Homs in Syria.  Specializing in the Middle East, Colvin also covered conflicts in Chechnya, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, and Sri Lanka. In 1999 in East Timor, she was credited with saving the lives of 1500 women and children from a compound besieged by Indonesian-backed forces. Refusing to abandon them, she stayed with a United Nations force, reporting in her newspaper and on television. She won the International Women’s Media Foundation award for Courage in Journalism for her coverage of Kosovo and Chechnya.  Colvin wore an eye-patch after losing the sight in her left eye due to a blast by a Sri Lankan Army rocket-propelled grenade in 2001, while crossing from a LTTE controlled area to a Government controlled area. She was also attacked even after calling out “journalist, journalist!” while reporting on the Sri Lankan Civil War; despite sustaining serious injuries, Colvin, who was fourty-four at the time, managed to write a 3000 word article on time to meet the deadline.  In 2011, while reporting on the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, she was offered an opportunity to interview Muammar Gaddafi, along with two other journalists that she could nominate. Colvin noted the importance of shining a light on “ humanity in extremes, pushed to the unendurable ”, stating: “ My job is to bear witness. I have never been interested in knowing what make of plane had just bombed a village or whether the artillery that fired at it was 120mm or 155mm .”     Cartel Land  ’s Matthew Heineman will direct from a script by  Arash Amel  based on Marie Brenner’s Vanity Fair article,   Marie Colvin’s Private War  .

entertainingtheidea:

Rosamund Pike has been to star in an untitled project that will tell the story of Marie Colvin, the American reporter who died while covering the siege of Homs in Syria.

Specializing in the Middle East, Colvin also covered conflicts in Chechnya, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, and Sri Lanka. In 1999 in East Timor, she was credited with saving the lives of 1500 women and children from a compound besieged by Indonesian-backed forces. Refusing to abandon them, she stayed with a United Nations force, reporting in her newspaper and on television. She won the International Women’s Media Foundation award for Courage in Journalism for her coverage of Kosovo and Chechnya.

Colvin wore an eye-patch after losing the sight in her left eye due to a blast by a Sri Lankan Army rocket-propelled grenade in 2001, while crossing from a LTTE controlled area to a Government controlled area. She was also attacked even after calling out “journalist, journalist!” while reporting on the Sri Lankan Civil War; despite sustaining serious injuries, Colvin, who was fourty-four at the time, managed to write a 3000 word article on time to meet the deadline.

In 2011, while reporting on the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, she was offered an opportunity to interview Muammar Gaddafi, along with two other journalists that she could nominate. Colvin noted the importance of shining a light on “humanity in extremes, pushed to the unendurable”, stating: “My job is to bear witness. I have never been interested in knowing what make of plane had just bombed a village or whether the artillery that fired at it was 120mm or 155mm.”

Cartel Land’s Matthew Heineman will direct from a script by Arash Amel based on Marie Brenner’s Vanity Fair article, Marie Colvin’s Private War.